Is your shifting smooth enough? Are you dropping your chain or having a hard time finding the right gears? Maybe you just want swifter, faster shifting? It might be time for an upgrade. You might rock simple bar-end twister shifters or the sportiest trigger-release levers. Either way, you want shifters that are reliable, lightweight and comfortable. Shifting is the most tactile aspect of biking, and smooth shifting makes a bike feel faster. Here at The Adventure Junkies, we make mountain biking easy by taking some of the mystery out of the gear selection.

PROS: Weight, quality, reliable, tactile.

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CONS: Grip position can be uncomfortable. CONS: Price, weight, incompatible with mountain bike derailleurs. PROS: Price, wide gear range, easy install. CONS: None we could find.

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PROS: Old school style, compatibility, price, weight. PROS: Easy install, price. SRAM pulls the cables at a ratio, and Shimano at a ratio. Shimano may feel slightly easier to shift, and SRAM may perform slightly better in inclement weather or mud.

The biggest issue is compatibility; you want to make sure that whatever your derailleur is, you buy the same shifters. If your rear derailleur is made by Campagnolo, you have an extra set of headaches. The next issue is a preference once.

The bike handlebar grips turn in order to shift, similar to the shifters on most of our first bikes. The step-up are triggers or twin levers; one lever goes up the gears, the other goes down.

They feel fast and snappy compared to twist shifters, and are the default on any bike setup for racing or competition. If you have twister grips and are swapping them out for twin-lever triggers, you probably need new grips. Indexed shifting is more accurate and precise.

When you press the button, the bike shifts to the next gear. You can shift better under load, too, partially because of the way the shifter works, and partially because of advances in cog manufacturing. You probably will want to stick with indexed shifters unless you know you prefer friction shifters.

Friction shifting is largely disappearing from the market. How many gears do you have? Look through their breakdown to determine what works best for you. Sram 3.

grip shifters vs trigger shifters

Specs Weight : g Trigger : No.I only have experience with grip shift and I like them. I feel trigger is more complicated and takes a little more getting used to. Would you agree? This is almost certainly one of the most sacred of religious questions. It surfaces every now and again wreaking havoc through out the riding community like the black plaque- leaving in its wake the the rotting and discarded souls of those once thought to hold the ultimate truth in matters like shifting.

The fact, truth, and answer to this matter is It depends. I mean it's really the difference between a "fishing reel" vs.

A real no brain-er for me.

Touring on a Bicycle: Trigger or Grip shifters

I've tried both-at the high end level. I ride steep terrain with drops, hops, step-ups, jumps, and trials like boulder hops.

I also enjoy training rides that include lots of grinding read: suffering up vast seemingly endless fire roads. There is no question here for me.

grip shifters vs trigger shifters

I ride rapid fire xtr shifters with a mid cage xtr derailleur. I like a system to snap then pay it no more attention until I need it to snap again. I want nothing to interfere with my need to twist my lock-on grips while climbing or pulling up onto a log or boulder. I don't care to auto shift when doing those things.

They work great. Pros and cons are really preferences. Both are good and I've used them. I'd say grip shift is a little better as you shift easy with both hands on the bars although most people can do it with trigger too. Personally I like grip, they don't seem to be an extra as they are wrapped on the handlebars. I'd say trigger would be easier to replace though as you don't need to take off the ends first they can just be taken off.

I like friction shifters best aka downtube shiftersbut I mostly road bike and it seems like you mean on a mountain bike. Grip shifts are simple because you don't have to think about shifting in order to do it, just twist your hand and you've got it done.

The downside is that they're hard to repair if they get off-track. My last hybrid bike that had grip shifters was never able to shift to the top gear because the shifter wasn't in alignment with the derauiller. Trigger shifts are simple to repair and actually pretty simple to get used to, too. As long as they are placed well on your handlebar, a quick flick of the thumb or finger can get you to shift. I like friction shifters best because they're really easy to adjust- since my bike has no suspension, if my cables ever get out of alignment there's a lot of play in the adjustments, and you don't even have to stop riding to calibrate anything.

You just adjust as you go. If you can find a bike with friction shifters, I'd go with those.

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I personally LOVE gripshift because I have a very small hand and find that the PUSHING required to get the thumb into the right place to get the derailleur into position on the large chainring can cause me thumb pain or worse, make me turn my handlebars a little causing me to crash.Mountain bikes are typically equipped with either a grip shift or trigger shifters.

The trigger shifters look more intimidating, but they are fun and easy to use once you get the hang of them. Most likely, if your bike came with trigger shifters, they will be Shimano RapidFire Trigger shifters. These shifters are very common on mountain bikes. There are two triggers on each shifter because the triggers only move in one direction.

The top trigger is in front of the handlebar, and it is operated by your index finger.

Do you prefer grip shift or trigger shift? Also, why?

The lower trigger which is a little bigger sits behind the handlebar and is operated by your thumb. The top trigger is pulled back towards you to shift; the bottom trigger is pushed forward to shift.

Pushing with your thumb will execute a shift to a larger cog or chainring.

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A quick pull with your index finger will shift to a smaller chainring or cog. The complicated thing is, this could shift to an easier or a harder gear. The right shifter the one operated by your right hand operates the rear derailleur, moving the chain between the eight or nine cogs on the cassette.

The left shifter the one operated by your left hand operates the front derailleur. It will move the chain between the three front chainrings. Pulling the front trigger back with your index finger will drop the chain down to a smaller chainring. Levi Bloom is an experienced endurance athlete who has been training and competing for over 17 years.

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A former Cat 1 road and mountain bike racer professional class on the regional circuithe is now a cycling coach USA Cycling Level 3 Certified and sports nutrition coach Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certified. Search for:. The Shimano Deore XT shifters are pictured to the left. Coach Levi. Practice Crashing, Avoid Injuries. The Attack Position. Tags: shifters. Leave this field empty. Hi, I'm Coach Levi. Want to feel better, ride faster, and look great?As is the fact that all bikes are not created equal, neither are the parts that make them up.

Shifters, for one, come in different styles and functionality. Since this is a component of your bicycle that you will use often and on a variety of road conditions, I think you should be aware of their differences and abilities.

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I caution you that, like so many other things on a bicycle, while the choice is yours to make depending on your likes and dislikes, there are some real problems with some shifters that can cause you physical distress over time. Caveat emptor! There are three major standard types of shifters on the market today, and two non-standard choices.

I will look at the good and bad aspects of all five with respect to bicycle touring. Grip shifters are limited to bikes with straight handlebars because of their placement as your handgrip Grip shifters force you to rotate your hand forward or backward in order to shift gears.

I would recommend people stay away from these. Trigger Shifters - These are normally light action shifters. Different styles will force you to use different fingers.

grip shifters vs trigger shifters

However, they will all keep your wrist in a stationary position, and the light action should not adversely affect your fingers. These are an excellent choice.

Since the shifter is incorporated into the brake lever, you can keep your hands on the hoods while shifting. You use minimal force on the wrist during shifting, so irritation is unlikely. Downtube Shifters — This type of shifter was the norm on road bikes two generations ago. These are a good choice. Thumb shifters - This was the standard shifter on mountain bikes three generations ago.

The stress on the thumb is greater than all the other shifters, and these would likely cause some hand issues over time. I would recommend people to stay away from these. When a rider tours he often goes long distances, over consecutive days, and does a lot of shifting because of varying terrain. That kind of repeated action can cause discomfort or injury over time.

Fill in your email below to request a new password. An email will be sent to the address below containing a link to verify your email address. Subscribe to our newsletter! Forgot password? New Customer Create an account with us and you'll be able to: Check out faster Save multiple shipping addresses Access your order history Track new orders Save items to your wish list Create Account.There are three major types of shifters in the market today, and two non-standard choices.

I will look at all five with respect to bicycle touring. Grip shifters - These force you to rotate your hand in order to shift. There will be additional stress on the wrist, and it will most likely create discomfort eventually. I would recommend people stay away from these. Trigger shifters - These are normally light action, different styles force you to use different fingers. However they all keep your wrist in a stationary position, and the light action should not adversely affect your fingers though that may be a problem on occasion.

These are an excellent choice. STI brake lever shifters - These are normal on road and touring bikes. You can keep your hands on the hoods while shifting. There is minimal forces on the wrist during shifting, hence irritation is unlikely. Downtube shifters - This was the norm on road bikes two generations ago.

These are a good choice.

grip shifters vs trigger shifters

Thumb shifters - This was the standard shifter on mountain bikes three generations ago. The stress on the thumb is greater than all the other shifters, and these would likely cause some hand issues over time. I would recommend people to stay away from these.

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Trigger shifters vs Grip shift shootout There are three major types of shifters in the market today, and two non-standard choices. Subscribe to our newsletter! Forgot password? New Customer Create an account with us and you'll be able to: Check out faster Save multiple shipping addresses Access your order history Track new orders Save items to your wish list Create Account.Join Walk Run Cycle.

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Log in. JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Gearing set up: changing from twist shift to thumb shift? Thread starter akb Start date 9 Aug Location Potton, Bedfordshire. Is it possible? My commuter has twisty gear shifters shim tourney from memory. My MTB has thumb shifters. I would really like thumb shifters on the commuter.

Is this a simple DIY change? The reason for the change is that I have fitted bar ends to the handlebars for comfort; changing gear becomes problematic and I just generally prefer the set up of thumb shifts and the quicker gear change. Im a complete nood to bicycle tech stuff, so any advice would be appreciated; and if possible what I would need to complete the swap.

Cheers in advance. GrumpyGregry Here for rides. I've gone the other way and back again on various bikes. Can get expensive, but you may well be able to get what you need secondhand and you need to match shifters to mechs and the number of gears the bike has. Pauluk Senior Member. Location Leicester. I have both on two hybrids and I prefer the rapid shifters to the twist shifters and the cables are often easier to replace as well.

Location Northamptonshire. Location South Tyneside. I would never buy a bike with twist shifters though maybe there are some good ones around. I upgraded from 7 speed shift to an 8 speed shift via ebay so just go ahead and do it.

Worst case is needing new handle rubber for the steering bar, some new front outer cable and maybe even new inner cables. All quite cheap. Rickshaw Phil Overconfidentii Vulgaris Moderator. Location Shrewsbury, Shropshire. Just to provide some balance; having used both trigger shifters and grip shifters I personally prefer the grip shifters.Polnoe govno vashi prognozi.

Sometimes everyone can mistaken. Wise decision-making in the workplace and outside requires considering not just short-term trends but longer-term ones. Sure, more jobs are getting automated but the worry may be overblown, at least for the next decade. Yes, much repetitive work will likely be automated but most jobs requiring substantial judgment will be augmented by but not replaced by technology. For example, the Social Security Administration will make more decisions by computer and, when there's an outlier or a complaint, a human will make the final decision.

The challenge will be in how to address the many millions of people who formerly did routine jobs. A guaranteed basic income is often proposed but it will require significant tax increases to companies and the middle class.

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Will the tax increase need to be so large as to kill incentive to work. Will it kill more jobs. But it lowers the quality of our goods and services. For example, today, the best cardiologists are so in demand, they may see patients evenings and weekends.

The worst may have trouble filling 20 hours a week. Under job rationing, more people would see worse cardiologists. Resumes, interviews, and references are notoriously invalid predictors of job performance and have been accused of racial bias. The answers will be recorded for the employer to review.

The gigification of America. The growing cost of mandated benefits when hiring an American full-time is fueling the increased conversion of full-time benefited jobs to temp gigs.

This trend will continue. Notwithstanding the current retracement, the nation is moving inexorably to single-payer health care. One way this will be addressed is accelerated replacement of high-priced MDs with physician assistants, anesthesiology assistants, physical therapy assistants, etc. Cost-control pressures will also accelerate efforts to create Virtual MDs.

Treatments should greatly improve thanks to individualized genomic medicine. If society deems it ethically acceptable, genomic medicine may not only cure disease but enhance: from altruism to intelligence. Within a decade, hallucinogens such as peyote mushrooms may be legalized. The government wants us out of our cars. Policymakers are working hard to get us to drive less, whether by not building freeways despite the population increase, reducing the number of parking spaces, increasing tolls, pay roads, carpool lanes, and expensive traffic tickets.